Bureaucracy gone mad?

 The other day, after fiddling with some minute surface mounted parts that seemed to prefer to stick to my tweezers rather than stay in place on the circuit board, I decided to buy some special glue.
I got this from Radiospares, or as it's known these days "RS Components Ltd".
It arrived with a sheath of paperwork explaining the dangers expected in its use, and remedies if one was silly enough to eat some or whatever.

For interest I counted the regulations involved in its use. There were 35, mostly generated by the EEC. There are others also. For example the glue meets ROHS requirements. Nothing alas on its efficiency and usability.

For those interested here's a list, much as they are referenced in the eight page document (leaving out repetitions of which there are many). Does Brexit mean that all the references, or a good many of them will need to be changed?

 

 17557-23-2

 25068-38-6

 EC 1272/2008

 1999/45/EEC

 EUH205

 EC No 500-033-5

 64/548/EEC

 241-536-7

 67/548/EEC

 CP0023

 91/155/EEC

 93/67/EEC

 93/105/EEC

 2000/21/EC

 ADR/RID/ADW

 IMDG

ICAO 

 Annex II of MARPOL 73/78

 IBC Code

 EH40

 2000/39/EC

 98/24/EC

 1907/2006

 2009 (S.1.2009 No.716)

 793/93

 1488/94

 76/769/EEC

 H315

 H317

 H319

 H411

 R36/37

 R36/38

 R38

 R43

 R51/53
   

 UN3082
     

 Admittedly the document gives instructions on what to do in most eventualities, but what about the supporting referenced documents? Well, if you needed to check on something specific you would need to put your hand in your pocket and shell out a few hundred pounds for each referenced document. Say there are 25 main documents… then you'll need £7,500.

What if I bought a tube of this glue over the counter in a retail shop? Would I be presented with an 8 page safety document?

Imagine starting a job.. say gluing a 1mm square chip to a circuit board. Should I read all the above documents before I start?

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