Components used from the mid-1920s to the early 1930s


Inter-stage coupling transformers

 This style of fully enclosed transformer replaced the open frame type by 1927 and continued, basically for the lifetime of the TRF receiver. Radiospares still sold interstage transformers in the 1950s but by then the designs had reverted, for cheapness and utility to open frames.

Here we have examples by four famous names from the 20s and 30s

 

Formo, the trade name of Arthur Preen & Co Ltd had their factory in Southampton and also made tuning condensers, vernier dials and reaction condensers

 

R.I. & Varley, made complete receivers in the 20s as well as their famous line in transformers. The earliest R.I.transformers were open-frame types but as people became fashion-conscious, as you can see from this selection, open frames were dressed up in smooth coverings, initially metal. This colourful example was being sold in 1927 as their "General Purpose Transformer for 15/-

 

Geco-Phone, the trade mark of the British, General Electric Company that made loudspeakers and complete receivers as well as various components such as this functional-looking transformer

 

Lotus the trade name of Garnett, Whitley & Co Ltd, a Liverpool firm made complete radio sets, valve-holders and other components such as vernier coil holders, jack switches and plugs from the early 20s. Their niche product was remote control for domestic radios. This transformer, being made of bakelite, carries a label bearing the date February 1931. 


Paper condensers

 

These are four similar paper condensers, all 2 Micro Farad TCC25/234 No.30. From the lettering they are of different dates, perhaps ranging from the early 1920s to 1931? The one still carrying part of its original wrapper has the word "approved" on it so it must be an early type needing the Post Master General's blessing for use in a radio set..

Each has a size of about 6" x 2" x 1" and was made by the Telegraph Condenser Company, hence TCC.

Early resistor

 

A tiny fixed resistor marked "25,000 ohms". Other early types were glass encapsulated and plastic-covered "spaghetti" types.

more wireless parts...... see some old mains connectors or return to entrance